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Fort Worth Law Blog

Can I ask the court to change my child support amount?

Paying child support is a necessary annoyance. While you may understand the logic of providing funds for your child's needs and wants, child support is an expense that does not fluctuate, no matter your financial circumstances. In fact, if you are experiencing a serious setback, you may find the monthly support payments to be a heavy burden or even a hardship.

With your other financial obligations, you certainly have alternatives to explore when times get tough. Child support, on the other hand, is a constant, and Texas family courts do not appreciate excuses when you do not pay. However, if you are going through a difficult time, you may find relief in a modification of your support payments.

More couples are turning away from divorce litigation

What it means to be a family has changed over the years. In most households here in Texas and elsewhere, strict gender roles no longer exist. Blended families exist all over the country, and many of them thrive.

Because of these and other societal changes, the way that people divorce has changed as well. Numerous couples decide to work together to reach a settlement on their own rather than engage in litigation. Granted, in some instances, going to court is necessary, but when possible, many couples take the opportunity to take another path.

How can you protect your interests in a high asset divorce?

Walking through divorce is a complex and emotionally challenging process, no matter how wealthy a couple is or how valuable their marital assets may be. However, couples facing the prospect of a high asset divorce may face unique challenges when resolving financial matters and settling property division issues. There are specific steps you can take to protect yourself and seek a positive financial future.

High asset divorces often involve complex real estate holdings, valuable savings accounts, business assets and more. For many of these things, it is not always easy to determine who should get what, and you may not even be certain of the value of many marital assets. It is in your interests to know how to protect yourself and seek a final order that is fair and sustainable well into the future. 

Is child support adjustable?

In Texas, when a couple divorces, each party is still required to supply financial support to their children. The court may order one parent to pay child support — usually, the person not named the primary custody holder or the spouse who has been the breadwinner in the marriage. The amount ordered is determined by looking at a number of factors. What happens if, down the line, the payer or payee feels there is an issue with the ordered amount?

Believe it or not, child support orders are adjustable. How can the payer or payee seek a support modification?

A peaceful way to negotiate a parenting plan

One of the most difficult issues to address during divorce is what will happen to the children. Texas parents are naturally concerned with the well-being of the youngest members of the family, and many times, they want to avoid litigation and stressful conflict for the benefit of the kids. You may want to do this by drafting your own parenting plan out of court. 

A parenting plan will outline how custody and visitation will work. When you decide to keep this matter out of court, you can effectively address specific needs and craft your plan to match your specific objective. Creating your own parenting plan can be a peaceful and productive way to address child custody concerns during your divorce.

Military parents have custody rights

As a member of the military, you are no stranger to sacrifice. You have undergone rigorous training, endured long periods separated from loved ones and accepted the duties that your superiors assign to you. When it comes to your children, however, you may not be as willing to sacrifice your time with them.

If you are dealing with child custody issues, you likely understand that your military service may negatively affect your efforts to obtain a custody arrangement that gives you equitable time with your children. Child custody matters are complex in the best of circumstances, and you may be concerned about protecting your rights. The first step is understanding how your service to your country plays into custody decisions.

Your nest is empty: Will gray divorce come next?

You may have heard that there's been a tremendous increase in divorce for people in Texas and throughout the nation who are age 50 and beyond. In fact, you may have done some research on the topic because you're considering filing for gray divorce yourself, which is the colloquial term that applies to the topic.  

Some wonder why anyone who has already been in a marriage to the same person for 15, 20 or more years would choose to divorce. Others, especially those who have "been there, done that," not only understand why but have shared common experiences with many others who divorced late in life. Even if your situation relates to a friend or relative who has filed for gray divorce in the past, every situation is unique in some aspect, so you'll want to secure support to address the issues you consider most important. 

Do grandparents have visitation rights?

Divorce is difficult for every member of a Texas family, including the grandparents. When the parents decide to end their marriage, it can lead to a disruption of other important familial relationships, including those with grandparents. As a grandparent hoping to maintain a good relationship with your grandkids, it may be beneficial to learn if you have any legal rights to visitation.

While some families are able to peacefully address grandparent visitation and allow schedules that provide the opportunity for regular visitation, this may not be the case for you. You have to take legal steps to secure access to your grandkids, even if there is clear evidence there is a strong relationship already in place and it would be in the best interests of the children.

Property division is complex when one spouse owns a business

When you and your spouse married, you may have known little about his or her business. However, you took a keen interest and learned whatever you could, even if only to participate in conversations at the dinner table. Throughout your marriage, your spouse's business may have been the primary means of support for your family. Now that you are approaching divorce, you may wonder how that business and its appreciation will play out in property division.

Your spouse may indicate that the business is not on the table. However, the law may say otherwise. Unless your spouse took careful precautions to protect the business from asset division, you may have a right to your fair share of its worth

Expanding your family through adoption

Watching your friends sharing pictures of their growing children on Facebook may have been difficult for you. As much as you love your nieces and nephews, a child of your own is something you have dreamed about for some time. Now that you have made the decision to adopt a child, you probably have many questions and, perhaps, even a little fear.

Whether you have struggled with infertility as one in eight couples do, or you are a single person hoping to raise a child, your commitment to the adoption process is crucial. If you are still uncertain, having a better understanding of how adoption works may solidify your determination to enter this rewarding process.

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